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    China | Teacher Resources

    China | Resources for Teachers

    If you are an educator teaching about China, these featured resources are designed for you. The websites linked below offer informative primary sources, organized curriculums, and other classroom materials aimed at bringing Chinese history, art, and culture into the classroom. In addition to the resources featured here, our Resources for Teachers page includes more generalized resources on East Asia as well as resource pages designated to specific East Asian countries (China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan). You can also find many other online materials listed on The National Consortium for Teaching About Asia's website. Be sure to also visit NCTA's Partner Sites, who provide excellent content on East Asia for K-12 educators.

    Easternization.pngChina in World History 

    Here, you can access three free and informative videos from expert Sara Schneewind. These videos, titled "Ming Voyages in China’s History: The Truth about the Maritime Expeditions Led by Zheng He of the Ming Dynasty," "Easternization (not “Westernization”): Modernity is a Global Formation," and "Footbinding: Confronting the Very Strange" are each designed to increase your understanding of Chinese history. Each video presentation also comes with 2 Professional Development Hours. To participate, sign in or register an account on the program site: www.asiaforeducators.org 

     

     

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     Chinese Calligraphy & Ink Painting (A Lesson Plan for Grades K-4)

    Are you an art teacher looking for resources on China for elementary students? Then look no further! Developed by The Kennedy Center, this lesson plan provides K-4 students with a fun art activity in the style of Chinese calligraphy. Students will learn the basics of watercolor and brush strokes, and apply this knowledge to create their own landscape painting. Students will engage in multicultural learning, as this lesson plan also provides traditional Chinese music and related vocabulary words.

     

     

     

    daoismDaoism | Asia Society

    This article from the Asia Society provides helpful background context and primary source references for teachers on the subject of Daoism/Taoism. Daoism originated in the 5th century B.C.E. from the teachings of Laozi and his classic text, the Dao De Jing. The basis of this philosophy was connection with nature, a life of simplicity, and a spiritual approach to the universe. Daoism, along with Confucianism and Legalism, is one of the philosophies that has shaped China for thousands of years and represents an integral part of Chinese history. For more information on Daoist primary sources, check out Dao Qian's "Peach Blossom Spring" provided by Asia for Educators, or a copy of Laozi's Dao De Jing provided by the University of Florida. 

     

    Confucianism

    Confucianism | Asia Society

    This article from the Asia Society provides helpful background context and primary source references for teachers on the subject of Confucianism. Confucianism was established between the 6th and 5th centuries B.C.E. by its founder known as Master Kong (Confucius, 551-479 B.C.E.) whose intention was to reinterpret the undefined Zhou religion. The basis of this social and ethical philosophy was tradition, defined roles within familial and social relationships, and mutual obligations. Confucianism, along with Daoism and Legalism, is one of the philosophies that has shaped China for thousands of years and represents an integral part of Chinese history. For primary source information on Confucianism, check out this translation of "The Great Learning" (one of The Four Books in Confucianism) provided by the Indiana University.

    shang yang

    Legalism | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

    Concluding our resources on Chinese philosophies, this Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry offers a comprehensive introduction and guide to Legalism. Legalism became popular in the latter half of the Warring States period (453–221 B.C.E.) as a representation of the teachings and beliefs of the scholars Han Fei, Shen Buhai, and Shang Yang (commemorated in the statue on the left). The goal of these legalists was to attain "a rich state and a powerful army" and to focus on the stability of the government and the people in such a turbulent time as the Warring States period. The basis of legalism was the belief that humans were inherently evil and selfish, and shouldn't be expected to act morally and abstain from coveting wealth and power. Instead, legalists believed that commoners and elites alike should be allowed to strive for wealth and fame in ways that benefitted the state, such as agricultural pursuits and warfare. Legalism, along with Daoism and Confucianism, is one of the Chinese philosophies that has shaped the country for thousands of years and represents an integral part of Chinese history. Out of these three philosophies, Legalism can be characterized as the prominent political philosophy rather than a moral philosophy. For primary source information on Legalism, check out this translation of Han Feizi (the text attributed to Han Fei) provided by Burton Watson.

     

    Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the need for online resources has never been greater. The ARNCTA is committed to facilitating teaching and learning about East Asia in elementary and secondary schools nationwide. As we extend our digital presence in 2021, ARNCTA will be developing original resources for teachers. For more information about COVID-19 and social distancing guidelines, please visit the CDC's website

    Who We Are

    Housed within the Asian Studies Program at the University of Central Arkansas, the Arkansas NCTA aims to empower elementary and secondary school teachers to center East Asian art, literature, history, and culture in their classrooms.

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